ASSESSING FAMILIES FOR

MULTIPLE FAMILY GROUP THERAPY

 1994 By Lewis N. Foster

 

     This writer discovered H. Peter Laqueur's factors that determine whether families can hold their own against environmental forces useful in deciding need and appropriateness for multiple family group therapy and readiness for leaving the group.  The names, order, and descriptions have changed in most, but follow the general outline of Laqueur's model.   (HPL #5) represents H. Peter Laqueur and the number in which Peter's factors were ordered. 

     The attention influence (HPL #5): For subsistence, the family must be able to focus on those events that are most important to survival of self and the family.  It must not indulge in the game of "putting off" until later what needs attention now.

 

     The tenderness influence (HPL #2): The family must be sensitive to and value the diversity of each member and express feelings, thinking and behavior openly.  Change in the neighborhood, community and society need to be dealt with flexibly, while maintaining the character and personality of the family.

 

     The choice influence (HPL #4): The family must also be able to make a realistic selection (with good judgment) between correct and incorrect impressions and information.  It's not what we don't know that causes problems; it is what we know that isn't true.

 

     The organization influence (HPL #1): The family must have enough of a structure to be able to react with sufficient adaptability and elasticity.  There needs to be a clear distinction, for example, between the parenting and marital relationships.  Both relationships must be nurtured regularly.

 

     The operation influence (HPL #3): If there is an overload of events and information, the family needs to be able to process all this in a productive manner.  The family exists essentially for the members, not the members existing for the family.

 

     The wisdom influence (HPL #6): The family must be able to collectively sense and recognize the situation(s); consider the options; inspect the feedback of the middleman (therapists); look at the consequences of each option; come up with the right solution(s) for them; make plan(s); and follow through with them.

 

 

Factors that determine whether an individual

 or a family can hold their own against environmental forces.

By H. PETER LAQUEUR, MD

 

 1.  The system can react with enough adaptability and elasticity.

2.  The system must be sensitive to variations in the external milieu and to changes in its internal milieu.

3.  If there is an overload of events and information, the system can process all this efficiently.

4.  The system can make a realistic selection (with good judgment) between correct and incorrect impressions and information.

5.  For survival, the system can focus on those phenomena that are most important and to concentrate its attention on high priority activities.  It can postpone occupation with dreams and fantasies until later, when there is time for it; so, it must not indulge in the game of "procrastination."  This, of course, does not apply to thoughts and creative images, which precede new ideas and inventions.

6.  The system can perceive of making logical plans and of executing them, while continuously seeing the mediator and final results (feedback).

Wolberg, L. R., Aronson, M. L.  Group and Family Therapy 1980.

       New York:  Brunner/Mazel, 1980.  p.p. 24-31.

(HPL #5) represents H. Peter Laqueur and the number in which Peter's factors were ordered.

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